Day 19 – Loe Bar to Kynance Cove

We made a good start from the car park at Loe Bar setting off at about 10am. Loe Bar was looking spectacular on this fine, dry, sunny late spring Bank Holiday Monday morning.

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Just above Loe Bar is this monument to those lost in the sinking of HMS Anson.

Our walk today was punctuated with numerous late spring flowering wild flowers. But what was more striking than anything were the blankets of Thrift in full bloom at every stage of our walk. We make an attempt at reproducing its beauty in our photos.

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Along the way we also came across this pretty flower which we struggled to identify. A fellow walker speculated that it might be wild carrot.

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We came across this rather strange looking sculpture at Gunwalloe. There were no obvious signs of the reason for it, but it was intriguing nonetheless. I speculated that it might be of a seal, but I don’t think Hilary was convinced!

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Hilary spotted this curious looking moth with striking black wings and white markings, above Halzephron Cove. We still have not been able to identify it.

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And nearby was this little patch of Scarlett Pimpernel.

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This pretty little church lies hidden right on the beach – St Winwaloe – at the aptly named Church Cove.

And just a little further along at Poldhu Cove these beautiful yellow flag irises were growing wild on the edge of the stream.

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If you’ve got to live in a retirement home, you could do a lot worse than this one on Poldhu Point! What a spot!

The sea today was really sparkly with classic turquoise blue colour reflecting the bright sunshine. This had drawn out the walkers, so we had more company than on some previous occasions.

Above Men-y-Grib was this home made memorial…

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… and just a little further along was this much more substantial one marking the contribution this area made to the telecommunications we take for granted today.

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Just before dropping down to Mullion Cove we saw this lovely show of the Hottentot Fig flower we learnt about on a previous walk.

Mullion Cove is much smaller than I had imagined,

but at at last we were able to enjoy some scrumptious local ice cream and decided to celebrate with our selfie (plus a shot taken by another kind-hearted walker also enjoying the break!)

Mullion Island lies just below the cliffs beyond the cove

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and at Predannack Head the National Trust have thoughtfully positioned this helpful waymarker:

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so we knew we were making good time as it was 1.30pm and we only had 2.5 miles to go!

Hidden away nearby, this discreet plaque marks the generosity of the Collins Family :

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At Soapy Cove the sea was looking particularly gorgeous and I often wish I was closer to the shore and could take a quick dip – it looks so inviting! I’m not sure Hilary would be so keen!

As Kynance Cove came in to view at about 2.30pm we could see the attraction of the spot. On this beautiful sunny afternoon there was a mass of holiday-makers on the beaches and lots of activity coming and going from the cafe and the car park at the top of the hill.

The only downside was that a local small bridge has been declared unsafe and cordoned off, so everyone had to scramble, with some difficulty, up and down some very slippery, smooth, rocky steps to get across to the path back up to the car park. I hope the council fixes it soon before someone has a nasty accident on those rocks.

We reached the car park at 3.15pm to discover that the car was now covered in some sort of saharan dust! It was pretty windy at the top there and the unfinished surface had been blowing around all day covering everything around it! Ho-hum.

Another successful walk – around 9 miles and we’ll surely make the Lizard next time – so we really will have turned a corner then.

 

 

 

 

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